…cite experts who agree with you

Hi Liz, I am bothered by my teacher’s claim that INVERSION is considered informal and should not be used in IELTS writing but only in speaking. Is it right?
Example: Hardly had the president entered the room when his supporters screamed.

…claim to be an expert if you’re not one

…use weak qualifiers like “I believe,” “I feel,” or “I think”—just tell us!

…provide facts, evidence, and statistics to support your position

Hello Liz, my exam was a week ago and I’m hoping for a very good result. Thanks to your website and YouTube channel. I would like to know why the exam body needs to know the candidates first language. A lot of people in my exam centre chose English, I chose my native language. Is there any implication?

…use strictly moral or religious claims as support for your argument

Also I had a query to ask,
Can I use famous proverbs or quotes in my IELTS academic Essays??
If yes then where would you recommend me to use them in the essay??

…provide reasons to support your claim

To see some more phrases that should be avoided, see .

In the body, you are providing information and arguments that should follow logically from the point expressed in your focal statement and should support it consistently throughout the paper. The body is made up of a series of paragraphs: packages of information, each beginning with a topic sentence that identifies the topic of the paragraph in the same way that the focal statement for the essay defines the specific topic of the essay. This topic sentence also provides a link not only to the previous paragraph but also to the focal statement of the essay, identifying how this information contributes to the stand you've taken. The topic of the paragraph is then developed with sentences which may provide examples, details, evidence or analogies. A broader concluding sentence for the paragraph may also be provided to tie the information together and remind the reader of how it relates to the focus of the essay.

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In general, written assignments require you to include introductory paragraph(s) and concluding paragraph(s) as well as a body containing any number of supporting paragraphs. Some longer essays may require the use of headings for introduction and conclusion as well as for categories within the body, whereas shorter essays may not.

…assume the audience will agree with you about any aspect of your argument

This essay will discuss both sides and give an opinion at the end.

Don’t learn expressions !!! You can learn a linking word “In conclusion” but not more. All words that follow must be unique to yourself and not copied from a book.

…attempt to make others look bad (i.e. Mr. Smith is ignorant—don’t listen to him!)

In the modern era, … / Since the dawn of time ….

Hi Mam,
My concern to you is while writing conclusion in Academic writing Task 2,is it useful to say,”From aforementioned cases and argument,we come to know that…..” in this way is it the right way to express?

We encourage the educational use of the OWL. The  explains the specific permissions granted.

The crux of the discussion is …

In the introduction, you should begin with the general issue and narrow down to the specifics of the problem you are discussing in your paper. Think of it as an inverted triangle. You should use the introduction to provide background information about the broad subject, identify the relevant problem or issue, and take the reader step by step to an understanding of why the specific focus of this paper is relevant to that subject. An introduction usually ends with some sort of statement of your focus (e.g., a focal statement, thesis statement, purpose statement, or hypothesis). This statement tells the reader specifically what point you are going to make or prove in your essay, and, if possible, how you are going to go about doing that. You might therefore suggest the method of organization you will be using in your paper, but not actually provide the information about the points.