Women and the Struggle for Equality Essay Example …

Of course humans will always search for different solutions to create fairness, but factors such as human greed, ignorance of mass populations, and even biological aspects stagnates the process of equality.

Women and the Struggle for Equality

The struggle for black equality was the event that turned the United States of America upside down.

Canadian women & the struggle for equality

The Color Purple, one of Walker’s most prized novels, sends out a social message that concerns women’s struggle for freedom in a society where they are viewed as inferior to men....

Struggle for equality essays on success

When John Steinbeck's short story "The Chrysanthemums" first appeared in the October 1937 edition of (Osborne 479), Franklin D. Roosevelt had just been reelected president. The country was recovering from the Great Depression, unions were developing, and child labor in manufacturing was terminated (Jones 805-6). The first female cabinet member in American history, Frances Perkins, was appointed the Secretary of Labor (Jones 802). She was one of the few women in her time to gain equality in a male-dominated society. For most women, liberation was a bitter fight usually ending in defeat. In "The Chrysanthemums," this struggle for equality is portrayed through Steinbeck's character Elisa Allen. According to Stanley Renner, "The Chrysanthemums" shows "a strong, capable woman kept from personal, social, and sexual fulfillment by the prevailing conception of a woman's role in a world dominated by men" (306). Elisa's appearance, actions, and speech depict the frustration women felt in Steinbeck's masculine world of the 1930's. "Steinbeck's world," observes Charles A. Sweet, Jr., "is a man's world, a world that frustrates even minor league women's liberationists" (214).

As such, it can be noted that the struggle of women for equality in American Society is not over.

Free College Essay The Struggle for Equality

After the tinker leaves, Elisa goes indoors to bathe. She scrubs herself "until her skin was scratched and red" (Steinbeck 335). By this action, Elisa is unconsciously withdrawing back to her feminine side and cleansing herself "of the masculine situation by turning to the feminine world in which she best functions" (Sweet 212). When she dresses, she puts on her best underwear and applies makeup to her face. By doing these purely feminine things, according to Marcus, she hopes to accentuate her role as a woman (56). Henry immediately notices the transformation and compliments her with the feminine "nice" instead of "strong," which is masculine. Elisa prefers "strong," but the meaning of it has changed from "masculine equal" to "feminine overlord" (Sweet 213).

Struggle for equality essays - …

While the struggle for women’s equality is not over, there is a proverbial “foot in the door.” In the context of gains in the various areas of society, women must continue to work together to advocate the common good and the good of the individual.

The Struggle for Equality - Essay by Godsgift23 - Anti Essays

The most prominent way that the struggle between ugliness and beauty presents itself in the novel is through Albert, Celie's forced husband, and Shug's long-time lover....

History Other Essays: African American Struggle for Equality

It is sometimes amazing that any progress has been made in the racial equality arena at all; every tentative step forward seems to be diluted by losses elsewhere.

the struggle for equality and liberation did not stop ..

The next situation involves the tinker. According to Sweet, he is to Elisa what the meat buyers were to Henry (211). Mordecai Marcus says that Elisa's first response to the tinker is that of a man, for she resists giving him work (56). But as the tinker talks, Sweet points out, Elisa's calculated and conscious masculine efforts become more and more feminine (212). The tinker then hits her in her vulnerable spot--her chrysanthemums. He pretends to be interested in her love for her flowers. He compares her flowers to a "quick puff of colored smoke" (Steinbeck 333). Elisa's feminine side begins to emerge as she takes off her masculine gloves and hat. She is attracted to the tinker because, as Stanley Renner points out, he represents a world of adventure and freedom that only men enjoy (306). She allows her emotions to control her and lets go of her masculine side, freeing her central feminine sexuality, according to Sweet (212). By the time she realizes her feminine emotions, it is too late: "Elisa's desires for equality are now bathed in failure" (Sweet 212). She has allowed herself to become emotional, "the trait women possess," whereas men conduct business unemotionally (Sweet 213). Elisa realizes her hopes for equality are nothing but a dream because she has been betrayed by her basic nature and by men. She gives the tinker the seedling and retreats indoors to find him some pots to mend.