Lewis' "The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe"

Beaver first saying Aslan's name and each of the children's reactions
Assemble in writer's groups
Pass our character sheets with space for attributes (vocabulary words)
Use online thesauruses via LearnPads to list 4-5 adjectives for each character
As a class, displayed on the SmartBoard, devise a list of these new vocabulary words
Lesson 4 - Allegory

Read passage aloud of Aslan's death in Lion, Witch, Wardrobe
Read same passage aloud of Jesus' death in Matthew, Mark, Luke, or John
Watch same scene in most recent screen version of Lion, Witch, Wardrobe
Watch same scene in Passion of the Christ, Mel Gibson's
Discuss all similarities we can think of
Assemble in small groups to critique and edit the "why allegory" writing exercise from Lesson 2.


Lesson 5 - Test knowledge

Take a formal, individual test of what has been learned
new vocabulary words
meaning of "allegory" and "symbol"
Include small essay portion of the test
"How is Lion, Witch, Wardrobe an allegory of the Bible?"
Allow for critique in writers' groups, revision, and final draft in a few days for the essay portion
Update observational notes on student behavior within groups to ensure target collaborative skills were achieved
Lesson 2 - Symbols in Names and Phrases

Pass out short article about The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe serving as an allegory to the passion of Christ passages in the Bible.
Assemble into writer's groups
Pass out sheet of names and word choices within The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe
Discuss as a group what the Biblical meaning might be for each item on the list
Ask each group to present a few ideas from their seats
Individually write 3 or more sentences on why someone might write an allegory.
6th grade
parochial
3 IEP's, 1 dyslexia

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe by C.S.

Lewis´ The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe and The New Testament in the Bible

The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe, by C.S.

Many of their fans prefer to read the books in chronological order (The Magician's Nephew; The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe; The Horse and His Boy; Prince Caspian; The Voyage of the Dawn Treader; The Silver Chair; The Last Battle).

Within The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, C.

It was not long after this time that Lewis wrote his series of classic children's books, beginning in 1948 with The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe.

Lewis’ Symbolism, Development and Morality in The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe Summary | SuperSummary

Through this essay I want to show you Lucy and Edmund’s similarities and differences as well as Aslan and the White Witch’s so that you will see the spiritual allegory portrayed through these characters.

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe Summary

C.S. Lewis (29 November 1898 - 22 November 1963) was a prolific writer, poet, scholar of English literature and defender of Christianity. His most famous book is The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, the first published of his Chronicles of Narnia.

The SWTs were the examinations, trials, and executions of alleged “witches” beginning in late February 1692 and ending in late October 1692.

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe Essays | GradeSaver

At the time of publication, The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe went against a trend towards realism in children's stories. Reviews of the books were not sympathetic; many were highly critical. This did not discourage its intended readership, who loved the books: they remain popular today.

Lewis uses development throughout The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe as a means to create vivid and more impressionable world.

The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe, by C.S. Lewis Essay

A witch to them was someone who could do harm through magical means, they could curdle milk, hobble animals, and even cause young children to sicken and die (Aronson, Witch Hunt 31).

One of the reasons that The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe can be considered a classic is that it has many strong universal themes....

The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe Discussion Guide

Lewis’ The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe, the fourth book in The Chronicles of Narnia, and the New Testament in the Bible, particularly the account of Jesus’ death is not merely coincidental because The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe is, in fact, an allegory.