01/02/2012 · In How the Other Half Lives, Jacob A

This chapter falls at about this essay's midpoint, and humanity's role in this story has yet to be told. As I conceived this essay, studied for it, wrote it, edited it, and had numerous allies help out, an issue repeatedly arose regarding the half of this essay just completed, and can be summarized with: "What was the point?" Not everybody asked it and some understood, but others wondered openly and sometimes subtly what the purpose of this essay's first half was (and some asked if the essay had any point at all and considered my effort a waste of time). This chapter is my reply, and I think it is important to understand.

How The Other Half Lives Analysis

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How the Other Half Lives- book talk - Duration: 2:45

Jacob Riis’s, How the Other Half Lives, write an essay on the topics and issues Riis explores in his book. Use this book as your main primary source, to explore the nuances of the topics exposed in Riis’s book. Throughout your essay also answer the following questions: What types of writing styles does Riis use? What were the circumstances that caused this book to be written? What are the problems that Riis brings to the attention of his readers, as he sees them? What are his solutions? Did Riis have an agenda? If so, what was it? Did Riis show bias towards any particular groups? If so, what were they? Use specific examples within the Riis text to answer explore these questions within your essay. Use different examples from the ones explored in the introduction, of course.

Jacob Riis, How the Other Half Lives, Knee ..

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An essay for my Social welfare class on the ideas of Riis as it is said in his book ‘How The Other Half Lives’
2 main questions:
1. Riis argues to form a character because to ‘reform’ a character may be a hopeless task, what does this quote mean?

15/10/2016 · how the other half lives jacob riis essay Владимир ..
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How the Other Half Lives , a photo essay by Jacob Riis

Only when economic surpluses (primarily food) were redistributed, first by chiefs and then by early states, did men rise to dominance in those agricultural civilizations. Because the rise of civilization in the Fertile Crescent is the best studied and had the greatest influence on humanity, this chapter will tend to focus on it, although it will also survey similarities and differences with other regions where agriculture and civilization first appeared. Whenever agriculture appeared, cities nearly always eventually appeared, usually a few thousand years later. Agriculture’s chief virtue was that it extracted vast amounts of human-digestible energy from the land, and population densities hundreds of times greater than that of hunter-gatherers became feasible. The , but today it is widely thought that population pressures led to agriculture's appearance. The attractions of agricultural life over the hunter-gatherer lifestyle were not immediately evident, at least after the first easy phase, when intact forests and soils were there for the plundering. On the advancing front of agricultural expansion, life was easy, but as forests and soils were depleted, population pressures led to disease, "pests" learned to consume that human-raised food, and agricultural life became a life of drudgery compared to the hunter-gatherer or horticultural lifestyle. Sanitation issues, disease, and environmental decline plagued early settlements, and not long after they transitioned from hunter-gatherers to farmers, but the land could also support many times the people. Another aspect of biology that applies to human civilization is the idea of . Over history, the society with the higher carrying capacity prevailed, and the loser either adopted the winner’s practices or became enslaved, taxed, marginalized, or extinct. On the eve of the Domestication Revolution, Earth’s carrying capacity with the hunter-gatherer lifestyle was around 10 million people, and the actual population was somewhat less, maybe . On the eve of the Industrial Revolution in 1800, Earth’s population was , and again was considered to be about half of Earth's carrying capacity under that energy regime. No matter how talented a hunter-gatherer warrior was, he was no match for two hundred peasants armed with hoes.

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How the Other Half Lives - Essay by Miniature

As with the previous Epochal Events (, , ), imagine an English peasant of 1500 being placed in the midst of London in 2014, or visiting today's average American home. The only metal in an English home of 1500 might have been some tools and eating utensils. Wood and wool were the primary materials in an English home. Some metals of the modern world would be vaguely familiar, but plastic would be unrecognizable. English peasants’ homes had thatched roofs, dirt floors, no plumbing, and people rarely bathed. Glass windows only existed in rich homes, which were built like fortresses. London was a walled city in 1500, and nobody went outside after dark if they valued their lives. Sewers did not yet exist, and violence and capital punishment were common. In England in 1500, only 1% of women were literate and only 10% of men. About half of all people died before adulthood, and if they survived that long, they could expect to live into their early 60s if they were lucky. Few made it to 70. Only rich people were fat. Strangers roaming the countryside could legally be enslaved. Modern appliances and machines would all be incomprehensible, and all electronic devices would seem magical. How much of a modern TV show would be understandable? Cars, trains, airplanes, and rockets would be mind-boggling. By 1500, news would have filtered into learned circles that Spain discovered some Atlantic islands, but nobody yet suspected that new continents had been discovered. The telescope would not be invented for another century, Earth was seen as the center of the universe, and the . Imagine trying to explain the Apollo moon landings to that peasant, if the peasant did not regard it as some fairy tale (many people ). Could an English peasant from 1500 dropped into 2014 London have ever adapted?

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professional essay on Jacob Riis's How the Other Half Lives

Could this essay's first half be considered an indulgence of my childhood fascination with nature? That argument could have merit, but I have always been a "big picture" kind of thinker, even as a teenager. I am writing this essay primarily to help manifest FE technology in the public sphere and help remedy the deficiencies in all previous attempts that I was part of, witnessed, heard of, or read about. The biggest problem, by far, was that those trying to bring FE technology to the public had virtually no support from the very public that they sought to help. My journey's most important lesson was that , and an egocentric humanity living in scarcity and fear is almost effortlessly manipulated by the social managers. John Q. Public is only interested in FE technology to the extent that he can immediately profit from it. Otherwise, he goes back to watching his favorite TV show. It took many years of disillusionment for that to finally become clear to me. While this essay and all of my writings are provided for free to humanity and anybody can read them, I intend to only reach a very tiny fraction of humanity with my writings, but that tiny fraction will be sufficient for my plan to succeed. The readers that I seek have a formidable task ahead of them, but nothing less is required for my approach to have any hope of bearing fruit. This essay and my other writings are intended as a course in (also called "big picture") thinking. Studying the details deeply enough to avoid misleading superficial understandings is also a key goal. I am an accountant by profession, but one of the world's leading paleobiologists surprisingly read an early draft of this essay and informed me that it was one of the best efforts that he ever saw on the journey of life on Earth. There was nobody on Earth whose opinion I would have respected more than his, so I do not think that I am asking readers of this essay's first half to humor me. Every sentient being on Earth should know the rudiments of what this essay's first half covers.