Ancient Egypt and Egyptian Art Essay - 858 Words | Major Tests

Similarly, we find that people in ancient Greece had the same ideas of harmony and they incorporated them in their architecture as well. Just like the Egyptians, the Greeks also considered the mental well-being of their people and worked to provide residential units that were designed to provide harmony and peace. Even according to the Greek religion, trees and gardens were considered to be places where the divine visited often. This is why most of the Greek houses in Athens had courtyards and gardens that were surrounded by walls. This is what was called a colonnaded garden. Some of the houses that were built on the hill sides of Athens included terraced gardens. The rich Greeks were known to have extensive and lavish gardens or pleasure grounds. The Greeks considered beauty to be a very important part of harmony and this is why they gave a lot of attention on making their abodes as beautiful as possible. This was usually done by landscaping and including gardens and courtyards in their houses. In the houses in Athens, people used to have delightful little gardens with running fountains. The inmates of that home heard these very fountains splash their refreshing waters among the flowers (MSN Encarta). This is again consistent with the Greeks religion and how the use of gardens and fountains in dwellings worked to create harmony for the residents.

Art Found In Ancient Mesopotamia And Egypt History Essay

Learn more about ancient Egyptian art and architecture with Grolier Online and Scholastic ART.

changing Egyptian art and architecture …

Ancient peoples in several parts of the world built pyramids, but the Egyptians constructed the biggest and most famous pyramids, with which this essay deals.

Egypt: Art and Architecture - Tampa Bay Times

There are still over eighty pyramids in Egypt today. They are all more than 3000 years old. The architects of these pyramids were very skilled in mathematics, in technical drawing, and in knowledge of the position of the sun and stars. The pyramids were carefully designed to be in a straight line with, for example, a certain star constellation at a certain time of year, or sunrise on a particular day.

The ancient Egyptians instilled their religion into every aspect of life including their art and architecture.
Egyptian art and architecture - Architecture: ..

Egyptian Art and Religious Influences Essay - 1453 Words

One of the most apparent aspects of both these civilization that sets them apart at a glance is the differences in their art. In ancient Egypt, various art forms, such as painting, sculpturing, crafts, and architecture were practiced. Much of the art depicted in ancient Egypt has been found to be symbolic in nature and it is mostly found on their tombs and monuments. Animals have been found to be represented in much of Egyptian art and they used many different colors to paint their paintings. Their colors were more expressive than natural and some exaggerations, such as red and yellow colors used for skin meant to imply youth or old age. Ancient Egyptians used many art forms where they depicted detailed humans in nature. Most of the painting that they made were meant to provide company to the people who have died in their afterlife. The ancient Egyptians made many of their paintings on papyrus, which was a kind of paper that they made from the papyrus plant found near the Nile. Ancient Egyptians also made many different kinds of potteries throughout the various ages including soapstone, vases, amulets, and images of their gods and goddesses. Sculpture was also a prominent art form in ancient Egypt with the Egyptians making large sculptures of their gods, Pharaohs, and kings and queens. One of the most prominent of their sculptures is called The Sphinx and it is one of the most recognizable images that represent Egypt after the pyramids. Another very prominent art form that distinguishes the Egyptian art from other art is their use of hieroglyphics, which is a script based on pictures and symbols.

Ancient Egyptian Religion as Seen in Art and Architecture

Egyptian and Hittite Empire Ancient Art Essay

The Ancient Egyptians believed that there was more to life than just the life on earth. Much of their architecture, including the pyramids and the houses they built were based on strict rules of mathematics and geography. They used mathematics to build the dwellings in very symmetrical designs. It has been noted that the numbers pi and phi have been greatly incorporated in the building and design of Ancient Egyptian architecture (Greenberg). Researchers have noted that dividing the perimeter of the dwellings made by Ancient Egyptians by their height gives a close approximation to 2pi, which is the same result one would get if one were to divide the circumference of a circle by its radius. This suggests that maybe the ancient Egyptians were trying to emulate the spherical nature of the Earth by presenting this relation (Smith et al).

Ancient Egyptian Religion Seen Through Art and Architecture

Egyptian art architecture essay | Fondazione Caffeina

These religious undertones were also apparent in the temples that the two civilization made. For the Egyptians, their pyramids and other temples such as the great Ramesseum had gret religious significance for the Egyptian. Similarly for ancient Greek, there is the great Acropolis. The Ramesseum is a temple complex that Ramesses II built between Qurna and the desert (Kitchen, 22). Various historians have referred to this complex of temple as one of the most gigantic and marvelous temples ever built in Egypt. The Ramesseum consisted of various courts, pylons, extremely large statues, and carvings of various war scenes depicted on the pylons. Overall, it was an extremely large and lavish piece of architecture that worked to show the grandeur of the great pharaoh. Even though Pericles did not actually built the Acropolis, he did conduct some major reforms to the architecture during his leadership. He built many new and large temples, and it was during the Age of Pericles that the Acropolis gained its final shape. It was also Pericles who commissioned the building of the Parthenon within the Acropolis.